• Eighth grade & Freshman:  Transition to High School
     
     
    Challenges for Students:
     
    Physical and emotional challenges- The move to Kenmore West High School means learning a new building, with many more students, new teachers, counselors, & administrators, new expectations, and more rigorous academic requirements.  In addition, students have to cope with establishing independence from their family while still maintaining family connections.  At this stage, parents have less direct input into school activities.
     
    Social challenges- Making new friends, balancing school work and social life, and for some, managing a part-time job, are new demands that students face.  Pressure to try new things (negative or positive) can be overwhelming.
     
    Academic challenges- Students are expected to have developed an assertive and efficient learning style, & good study and organizational skills.  The transition to high school means entering into an academic environment which assumes the student can take responsibility for decisions regarding course selection, career paths, and post-graduation plans.
     
     
    SMOOTH TRANSITION + PARENT INVOLVEMENT =
    ACADEMIC SUCCESS
     
     
    Students need parent support & guidance
    during this transition period
     
     
    What can parents do to help?
     
    ·  Be interested and enthusiastic about their move to high school.  Your encouragement will help your child to make a successful transition.  Listen to their experiences and expectations.
     
    ·  Discuss the changes every student will experience.  Emphasize that many people feel nervous about changing from middle school to high school, and that there are people at school to help them adjust.  Encourage them to seek out staff members, such as their counselor, a teacher, or resource officer.
     
    ·  Learn about school routines and timetables.  Talking to older high school students can be useful to find out information about athletics, clubs, and organizations.  Be sure to carefully read all of the information sent home over the summer and through the year, as well as check the Kenmore West website often.  Be familiar with our high school's policies for attendance, dress code, and eligibility requirements. 
     
    ·  Help your child develop good study habits.  Try to provide them a quiet space to concentrate.  Help your child set aside a particular time to study.  Work out a daily timetable that incorporates all of your child's needs and interests.  Ultimately, they will need to manage their own study time, but you can help get them started.
     
    ·  Practice organizational skills.  Throughout the school year, check that your child is bringing home the proper textbooks and homework.  They can use a dry erase board or calendar to keep track of important dates (tests, projects due).  All Kenmore West students receive an agenda book at the start of the year to help with organization.
     
    ·  Discuss emergency and safety issues.  Talk about various events that could happen in the school day and how to proceed.  Allow your child to contribute their views.  If there are any concerns or questions, contact school staff to find the correct information.
     
    ·  Let your child know that you trust them and that they can trust you.  Keep communication open about all your child's experiences, and let them know you are willing to talk if things go wrong.
     
    ·  Help your child set priorities.  The expectations and responsibilities of high school are much different than what your child experienced in middle school.  Help your child evaluate the levels of importance they place upon their academic requirements versus social activities.
     
    ·  Support and work with school administrators, teachers, counselors and other staff members.  Like you, we want your child to have a smooth transition to high school.  Let your child know you consider their education a top priority.  Attend open houses, insist that your child be in school and on time every day, and show consistent interest in your child's academic progress.
     
     
     
     
Last Modified on December 12, 2016